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What the strategy covers

Last updated on 25 Jun 2019

Types of research

This strategy covers health and social care research taking place in the UK which involves people, their tissue or their personal data. Information about research studies of this kind should be made public.

The initial focus of this strategy is on clinical trials. These are research studies that test the safety and effectiveness of patient interventions such as medicines, medical devices, surgical techniques, public health measures and behavioural therapies (for more detail, see our transparency information). We will consider other types of research, such as observational studies and questionnaires, at a later stage.

Types of transparency

Research transparency refers to:

  • registration (making it public that a study has started)
  • reporting results (making it public what the study has found)
  • feeding back to participants (informing those who took part what the study has found)
  • sharing study data and tissue (enabling further research). 

Juliet-Tizzard

All of these types of transparency are important. However, the initial focus of this strategy is on registration, reporting results and feeding back to participants. 

We believe that these are the priority areas for the HRA. Others in the research system are best placed to continue to enable appropriate sharing of study data and tissue.

Juliet Tizzard, HRA Director of Policy

The different players involved in research

Everyone involved in research, from funding bodies to publishers, has a part to play in promoting transparency and openness in health and social care research. However, this strategy focusses primarily on researchers and research sponsors.

Research sponsors are organisations which take on overall responsibility for the research project. This includes ensuring appropriate arrangements are made for registration, reporting results and feeding back the study findings to participants. In commercially-funded research, the sponsor is the funder. In non-commercial research (government or charity funded), the sponsor is normally the university or NHS organisation which employs the chief investigator.

Researchers, in particular the chief investigator, are responsible for the overall conduct of a research project. This includes adhering to the arrangements for registration, reporting results and feeding back to participants agreed with the sponsor.

For more information, see the UK Policy Framework for Health and Social Care Research.

Researchers, in particular the chief investigator, are responsible for the overall conduct of a research project. This includes adhering to the arrangements for registration, reporting results and feeding back to participants agreed with the sponsor.

For more information, see the UK Policy Framework for Health and Social Care Research.
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