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Narratives of NHS nurses working in ICUs during the COVID-19 pandemic [COVID-19]

  • Research type

    Research Study

  • Full title

    Narratives of NHS nurses working in intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic

  • IRAS ID

    284812

  • Contact name

    Wendy Solomons

  • Contact email

    w.solomons@herts.ac.uk

  • Sponsor organisation

    University of Hertfordshire

  • Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier

    n/a, n/a

  • Duration of Study in the UK

    1 years, 1 months, 1 days

  • Research summary

    This study will explore the experiences of nurses working in intensive care units (ICU) during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the face of a high number of deaths, pressures on resources, staff shortages, ethical dilemmas, unwell colleagues, and greater exposure to COVID-19, for nurses working in ICUs emotional distress is anticipated. There is already a known shortage of nursing staff in the NHS, particularly ICU nursing staff, even before COVID-19. It is therefore paramount that their experiences are explored to support the retention and future recruitment of nurses. \n\nThere has been a considerable amount of quantitative research, mainly through surveys and questionnaires, regarding nurses’ emotional wellbeing during COVID-19. However, studies that only use self-reported questionnaires do not explore the experiences in depth. Largely absent from the literature is research that explores narratives. \n\nApproximately eight participants will be recruited from Harefield Hospital, for in-depth analysis (see below). This study will take the form of an individual semi-structured interview (approx. 90 minutes) with Hannah. Participants will be invited to talk about their experience of working in the ICU during the pandemic. The interview will either take place face to face, at Harefield Hospital or over remote video technology, such as Accurx or Webex, as per security and data protection measures provided by the University and the NHS Trust.\n\nThis study is supported by the University of Hertfordshire in collaboration with Harefield Hospital. Provisional approval has been granted from the Research and Developmental Team, Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. As this study is part of a Doctoral qualification, there are time limits to the project and therefore is anticipated to be completed by June 2021, and submitted for publication to peer-reviewed journals soon after.

  • REC name

    N/A

  • REC reference

    N/A