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Low-intensity internet delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT)

  • Research type

    Research Study

  • Full title

    The potential impact on access, outcomes and cost of using low-intensity internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) for people in IAPT services as a prequel to high intensity therapy (HIT) for depression and anxiety disorders.

  • IRAS ID

    194080

  • Contact name

    Derek Richards

  • Contact email

    Derek.Richards@silvercloudhealth.com

  • Sponsor organisation

    SilverCloud Health (Dublin Offices)

  • Duration of Study in the UK

    0 years, 6 months, 1 days

  • Research summary

    Depression and anxiety disorders have been ranked high among the leading causes of disease burden throughout the world. Lifetime prevalence of anxiety rates are estimated to be between 4.3-5.9%. It is also expected that by 2030, depression will overtake other chronic illnesses and heart disease as the most common and prevalent disease. With the massive emphasis that has now been placed on mental health, the UK’s National Health Service has introduced the improving access to psychological therapies (IAPT) programme with the goal of treating those with anxiety and depressive disorders. The most common treatment for these disorders is cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), with internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) being a suitable IAPT approved treatment for individuals requiring step 2, low-intensity treatment. Success has been observed for iCBT treatments at the step 2 level, however its applicability to those who require step 3 intervention is relatively unknown. As such, the current study will endeavour to investigate some of the potential impacts on outcomes (clinical, functional and cost) of using low-intensity internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for people in IAPT services at step 3 as a prequel to high intensity therapy (HIT) for depression and anxiety disorders.

  • REC name

    London - Brighton & Sussex Research Ethics Committee

  • REC reference

    16/LO/0331

  • Date of REC Opinion

    16 Mar 2016

  • REC opinion

    Unfavourable Opinion