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  • Will the general practice state-backed indemnity scheme (CNSGP) cover me as a GP for clinical negligence arising from research that I am undertaking in my practice on behalf of others e.g. NIHR CRN Portfolio studies?

    The Clinical Negligence Scheme for General Practice (CNSGP) does not cover the design or management of clinical research or clinical trials. However, the scheme does cover practices for clinical negligence in conducting research with NHS patients in England, by way of care, diagnosis or treatment under one of the standard NHS primary care contracts, on or after 1 April 2019. For example, if a clinician negligently misreads a dose in the trial documentation and administers too much of a drug which harms their NHS patient, cover will apply. Where research activities are undertaken in relation to a private patient, or in the course of any non-clinical contracted activity, CNSGP will not apply and separate indemnity arrangements are required.

  • Will the new scheme cover practice staff, such as my research nurse, who is working within my practice undertaking research on my behalf?

    Yes – all practice staff providing NHS primary care medical services including locums, nurses, students and trainees are covered for clinical negligence under CNSGP when undertaking the research activities specified in Answer 1 above.

  • Will the new scheme cover my research nurse who works across several local Federation practices recruiting patients?

    Yes – CNSGP covers the implementation of research, in accordance with answer one above, by staff working across practices in England as part of the provision of NHS primary medical services.

  • Will the new scheme cover my practice undertaking industry-sponsored commercial research?

    The conducting of industry-sponsored research, if undertaken as part of the care, diagnosis or treatment of a patient during the provision of NHS primary medical services in England, is covered under CNSGP. Where research activities are undertaken in relation to a private patient, or in the course of any non-clinical contracted activity, CNSGP will not apply and separate indemnity arrangements are required.

  • Will the new scheme indemnify me as a Principal Investigator if I undertake my own research within my practice?

    CNSGP does not cover the design or management of clinical research or clinical trials, and alternative indemnity arrangements are required for this. However, the scheme does cover practices for clinical negligence in conducting research with NHS patients in England, by way of care, diagnosis or treatment under one of the standard NHS primary care contracts, on or after 1 April 2019.

  • Will the new scheme indemnify NIHR CRN nurses coming into my practice to undertake research on behalf of the CRN?

    Yes – such nurses are covered under CNSGP for the research activities specified in answer one above.

  • Will the new scheme indemnify me for research studies led by PhD students in my practice?

    Yes - CNSGP extends to all those working for practices in England providing NHS primary care medical services, including students, when undertaking the research activities specified in answer one above. Activities outside that definition will require alternative indemnity arrangements.

  • My MDO classes certain procedures as higher risk, resulting in significant loading of premiums. Is prior authorisation required from NHS Resolution for such activities or to confirm?

    No - research in receipt of Health Research Authority and Health and Care Research Wales (HRA and HCRW) Approval will have been appropriately risk assessed. Appropriate assessments should be made to ensure that individuals undertaking clinical procedures are suitable to do so, in line with local clinical governance and research governance arrangements.

  • If, as part of an NHS research study, I take bloods from patients registered at another practice, am I covered under the state indemnity scheme (CNSGP)?

    Yes - if the research falls into the definition in answer one above.