AMPSIM

Full title A pilot study to compare Virtual Reality (VR) versus VR plus haptic feedback as a possible technique to decrease phantom pain responses in amputees
Research type Research study
IRAS ID 179870
Contact Name Rui CV Loureiro
Contact Email R.Loureiro@ucl.ac.uk
Sponsor organisation Middlesex University
Eudract number
ISRCTN number
Clinicaltrials.gov identifier
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Research summary A large percentage of amputees (50-80%) experience feelings and sensations in their amputated limbs, with varying degrees of severity. Of these, phantom limb pain can be one of the most distressing and debilitating. The origins of phantom limb pain are not well understood and it is therefore very difficult to treat. It has been suggested that phantom limb pain arises as a result of the absence of feedback from the missing limb, to the otherwise intact motor control regions of the brain. When we want to move, signals are sent from our brain to the part of our body we want to move. The brain receives feedback about the movement primarily through our sense of touch and vision, but also from our other senses. Following amputation, the brain will continue to send instructions to the missing limb, some conscious and some unconscious, but will not receive any feedback, and it is thought this results in the sensation of pain. What we want to investigate in this research is whether it is possible, through the use of modern technology, to reduce phantom limb pain through a series of computer controlled tasks. What is proposed in this research is to employ state of the art virtual reality (VR) glasses in conjunction with a haptic robot that will create a much more realistic illusion for the wearer. The volunteer will be asked to perform a number of tests on a number of occasions, and any perceived changes in phantom limb pain will evaluated.
REC Name West Midlands - South Birmingham Research Ethics Committee
REC Reference 15/WM/0147
REC Opinion

Further Information Favourable Opinion

Further Information Favourable Opinion

Date of REC Opinion 19 May 2015